Saturday, September 9, 2017

Message from our @TulsiGabbard



Our Revolution

Aloha
For so long, young people who came to this country as kids through no choice of their own, have been forced to live in the shadows, too afraid to come forward because they don't trust that our government won't come after them. Even after DACA was put in place, so many were too afraid to apply because if the program got taken away, the government would know where they live and could go after them and their families.
But 800,000 young people in this country took that leap of faith, applied for DACA, and have relied on it to obtain an education, earn a living, and establish themselves in our communities.
The current administration's decision on Tuesday to end DACA leaves them feeling betrayed and afraid after they put their trust in our government.
Last week on Maui, I sat down with some of Hawaii’s DREAMers and heard their stories about living every day in fear of deportation until DACA was put into effect. They shared their stories of the opportunity and freedom they have experienced because of DACA, and the fear of uncertainty that now lies before them, with the prospects of their government targeting them and forcing them to leave the only home they’ve ever known.
This is not a partisan issue. It's an issue that affects communities all across this country. DACA’s termination is a call for Congress to act now. We should take this opportunity to actually fix the problem once and for all and provide a permanent solution for these DREAMers, so they are not forced back into the shadows.
I have had many conversations with people about this issue. I have spoken with those that support DACA, and those that do not support it. However, the most important part of any conversation about immigration and DACA is to be informed with the facts.
What is DACA?
DACA is a temporary program instituted by President Barack Obama that defers immigration action and provides relief from deportation for people who were brought into the United States as children and gives them a work permit.
Who is eligible for DACA?
The people who apply for and receive DACA must meet a number of requirements, including: they were under the age of 16 when they were brought into the U.S., they have lived most of their lives here, they are in school or have graduated or are an honorably discharged member of the military, they have not been convicted of a felony, a significant misdemeanor, or three or more misdemeanors.
How many people have DACA?
There are around 800,000 recipients of DACA right now in the U.S.
What can I do?
At the Sanders Institute, we believe that being informed, engaged, and involved in the discussion about an issue and a policy like DACA are the first crucial steps.
Thank you for staying engaged,
Tulsi Gabbard
Sanders Institute Fellow


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Friday, September 8, 2017

Important organizing message from our @NinaTurner




Our Revolution


As Our Revolution begins our second year, we're focusing on sustaining our movement by supporting our members and our groups. Members are those who join at events or join by making any donation. Membership is meant to be simple and inclusive. We encourage OR members to join groups or start a group. Our website includes a map of more than 400 registered groups with more added every week—find yours at https://ourrevolution.com/groups/.
For example, Somerville Our Revolution is part of an amazing network of Our Revolution groups across Massachusetts and nationally. Somerville has a full slate of council members and a mayoral candidate and the group hopes to change the direction of the entire city government. Our Revolution members there are working hard, lobbying their member of Congress on the eight national issues that make up the People's Platform.
This movement is built by folks at the grassroots, and you have taken part in helping Our Revolution grow at an extraordinary pace in our first year. Whether you have contributed or attended an event, your participation in our cause has not gone unnoticed. We appreciate each and every one of you.
This combination of issue work, candidates and ballot measures, and political organizing make up the core of Our Revolution member involvement. But many members choose to engage through online action and are not members of groups. No matter how members contribute, we are building a unique political movement that goes beyond resisting Donald Trump and the politics of reaction, instead fighting for a progressive populist future. Our Revolution membership packages include:
  • An Our Revolution membership card
  • A welcome packet from myself and staff
  • Free Our Revolution sticker
  • Monthly membership newsletter
  • Connecting you with a local Our Revolution group or status as a “Member-at-Large”
  • Having your voice heard in surveys which will shape the future of OR

Our Revolution is built on the strength of your efforts, and our membership program is how we plan to strengthen the connection between you, our staff here in Washington and other member affiliates across the country. I look forward to the great work we will continue together.
In solidarity,
Nina Turner
President
Our Revolution



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Not authorized by any candidate or candidate committee. Our Revolution is a 501(c)(4) organization. Donations to Our Revolution are not deductible as charitable contributions for Federal income tax purposes. All donations are made to support Our Revolution’s general mission and are not designated for any specific activity.
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 Help us continue transforming American politics and fighting for progressive candidates and causes by contributing to Our Revolution here.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Kaepernick's protest is part of a patriotic tradition ~ @RevJJackson



Colin Kaepernick is treated as a pariah because he protested the continued oppression "of black people and people of color."
Kaepernick's protest is part of a patriotic tradition
BY JESSE JACKSON
August 31, 2017

Colin Kaepernick, the former quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers, is being blackballed — itself a revealing phrase — from the National Football League with the collusion of the all-white owners. He is ostracized because a year ago he exercised his First Amendment right to free speech by taking a knee during the playing of the national anthem.
Kaepernick isn’t hooked on drugs. He isn’t a felon. He hasn’t brutalized women. He is treated as a pariah because he protested the continued oppression “of black people and people of color.” He wanted, he said, to make people “realize what’s going on in this country. … There are a lot of things going on that are unjust, people aren’t being held accountable for, and that’s something that needs to change.” Born in Milwaukee, Wis., one of the most racially segregated cities in America, Kaepernick is particularly concerned about police brutality and the shocking police shootings of unarmed African Americans.
Surely his cause is just. Tens of thousands have joined peaceful demonstrations against police brutality in cities across the country. That movement, led by Black Lives Matter, put the issue of our institutionalized criminal injustice system back on the national agenda. Under President Barack Obama, the Justice Department reached agreements with dozens of police departments to change police training and tactics. There was bipartisan agreement to change racially discriminatory sentencing practices.
Kaepernick’s protest was nonviolent and dignified. The San Francisco 49ers, the NFL and President Obama all agreed that it was a protected act of free speech.
Yet the owners of the NFL and their front offices have ostracized Kaepernick. No follower of the sport would question his skill level. There are 64 quarterbacks on NFL teams, many of whom can’t hold a candle to Kaepernick. He’s ranked as the 17th best quarterback in the league. When he came back from injury last year, he started the last 11 games, racking up a 90.7 QB rating, with 16 touchdowns running and passing and only four interceptions, while playing on a team sorely lacking in talent. That rating was better than stars like Cam Newton, Philip Rivers and Eli Manning, among others.
Sports writers report that Kaepernick is loathed by the white owners and front offices, some of whom denounce him as unpatriotic. But what Kaepernick did — a dignified, nonviolent protest to raise awareness of a true and just cause — is the height of patriotism. It is the essence of democratic citizenship.
Others claim Kaepernick is excluded because he would be divisive, and teams have to be run with military discipline. But, our military has learned to succeed with people of all races, genders, sexual preferences and political perspectives. Almost 70 percent of the players on NFL teams are African American. For most of them, Kaepernick’s protests are not as divisive as Tom Brady’s open support of Donald Trump. Last year, Kaepernick’s teammates voted to give him the annual award for “inspirational and courageous play.”
No, Kaepernick is being treated as a pariah by the private club of white owners who are terrified of controversy. They clean up big time from public subsidies — tax breaks, public contributions to stadiums, television contracts — and they tremble at anything that might disrupt the gravy train. They want to make an example of Kaepernick as a way of teaching the rest of the players a lesson, hoping to keep plantation-like control of their players.
Kaepernick stands in a proud history of African-American athletes who have used their prominence to protest racism at home and unjust wars abroad. They have chosen to speak out at the height of their powers and in their prime money-making years. Often they have paid a high price personally, in their careers, their finances, their stature. And yet in the end, their sacrifice helped make this country better.
Muhammad Ali opposed the Vietnam War and was prosecuted for refusing to be inducted into the armed forces, stripped of his title and barred from fighting. He lost some of the best years of his boxing life, but his protest helped build the antiwar movement that eventually brought that tragic and misbegotten war to an end.
Curt Flood, an all-star centerfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals, refused to be bought and sold “like a slave.” His protest and litigation cost him much of his career, but it broke open the owners’ control of players, opened the way to free agency and transformed baseball.
Jackie Robinson broke open the racial barrier in baseball. He endured seasons of racial insult, on and off the field. His remarkable skill and character transformed baseball, and helped spur the civil rights movement. He joined Dr. King in the demonstrations for civil rights. In his autobiography, “I Never Had It Made,” published just before his death, he related his own feelings about the national anthem, as it played at the beginning of his first World Series game:
“There I was, the black grandson of a slave, the son of a black sharecropper … a symbolic hero to my people. … The band struck up the National Anthem. The flag billowed in the wind. It should have been a glorious moment for me as the stirring words of the National Anthem poured from the stands. Perhaps, it was, but then again….
“As I write this 20 years later, I cannot stand and sing the anthem. I cannot salute the flag; I know that I am a black man in a white world. In 1972, in 1947, at my birth in 1919, I know that I never had it made.”
Colin Kaepernick stands in a proud tradition. For choosing to speak out, he has been shut out. The collusion of the owners not only violates antitrust laws; it tramples basic constitutional protections. The NFL owners should be called to account, not Kaepernick.


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